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SPECIAL REPORTS
        Earlier reports are found in SPECIAL ARCHIVE


Body cams delayed for a year
Changing technology, high storage costs cited

(Posted July 21, 2017)


Scroll down this page for January story about Police Department briefing City Council on the body cams program and how it would work.



You won’t be seeing Casa Grande police officers wearing video body cameras for at least a year.

The delay is a situation of rapidly changing technology and hefty storage prices set by suppliers, the City Council was told during Monday’s night review of the city budget for this fiscal year.

“We would need 60 of those cameras and we would want to deploy those at one time rather than trying to do a phased system, which is what we had talked to council about prior,” City Manager Larry Rains told the council.

“Just to give everybody a context of what that would cost, or the approximate cost, to the city to deploy those cameras would be roughly $383,000 to $425,000 a year.

“What I want to make clear is it’s not the technology that you’re paying for today, it’s not the cameras our officers would be wearing.

“It’s actually the cost for data storage and a variety of other costs associated with the technology component of the network and whatnot to be able to put into the data storage.

“While economics drove some component of the decision to not fund it this particular year, what ultimately was driving, the primary driver, is the fact that we’re finding that the technology continues to change — it’s pretty new — and we’re finding that there appears to be more vendors in the market and appears to be more and better technology that is coming on the horizon.”

As an example, Rains said the Police Department did a test program of cameras “and within a short period of nine months, that camera wasn’t even available, they’re going to another one. And ultimately, the price continued to be reduced, practically down to zero today”

Lower camera prices doesn’t always mean a savings, Rains added.

“When we first started the quotes, for lack of a better word, it was we’ll sell you a camera for $600 and that’ll cover storage and within a short amount of time it went went the cameras are free and we’re going to charge you for storage.

“What we’re finding in the market today is that the companies that are in the business are ultimately buying very cheap storage space out on the market and then they’re tripling their fees as part of these packages.”

The data and storage cost estimate is about $400,000, Rains said.


Added personnel

“Included in that are the costs of personnel,” he continued. “We had anticipated that we would need at least one, at a minimum, new personnel to be working in the attorney’s office. And, quite frankly, we envisioned that as we did our five-year model we would need someone in the Police Department to deal with the number of public records requests and that amount of work that gets done before any of that video could ever be released.”

Councilman Matt Herman said that during an earlier discussion he was told that it was estimated that it would take 10 hours of staff time to prepare each hour of video that was requested.

That is mostly that because of privacy issues, some sections would have to be removed, faces of bystanders not involved in the incident would have to be blurred, their names removed, along with other sensitive information.

Rains said that Deputy City Manager Steven Weaver has done research nationally, finding that other police departments are spending about 10 hours on each hour of video.

“The second component,” Rains continued, “is there appear to nationwide be a debate, from a legislative perspective, about whether or not these videos would be subject to public records requests, the length of time the cities would have to store that, and in Arizona I think we’re just now starting to get familiar with that …”

Thus, it was a combination of reasons for deferring the cameras for a year, Rains said, adding that, “But what I want to make the council fully aware of is that this is something that is not going to be put on the back burner, we’re going to continue to evaluate it, we’re going to continue to look for the changes in the technology that would best suit our department here in Casa Grande, we’re going to look at costs, we’re going to look at a variety of things and it will definitely be a topic that we have as we move into next budget year.

“And I think it’s important to note one additional component — and certainly just my perspective, everyone likely has their own — at least from my chair it appears that our relationship with our community, between the Police Department and the community, appears to be fairly strong at this point. Internally it feels like it’s very strong, as well.

“I’ve talked to Chief (Mark) McCrory about this, he obviously has protocols within the department and a fair amount of practices to look into citizens’ complaints and the like. Regardless of whether we have body cameras or not, we stand ready to be fully transparent in that operation for that department.”


Council reactions

Councilman Ralph Varela said there are two important items to the discussion.

“One is the relationship of the Police Department to the community and the relationship of the community to the city and it’s council, so I think you’re absolutely right.

“I think the other point that’s really important is the internal integrity of the Police Department and how it’s assessed by the community itself. I think in regards to that, we’re in very good standing.”

Varela said one thing about deferring the cameras for a year is that by that time they may not be a priority.

“Maybe it’s more important in relationship to drug-related crimes or domestic violence crimes,” he continued. 

“Then I think we can step back and say where would we want to put $450,000 if we’re going to invest in one or the other. But we’ve got a year to kind of mull that one over, as well.”

Councilwoman Lisa Fitzgibbons said it was initially “very concerning” to her when she learned that the cameras would be deferred, given that other police departments are using them.

“I had discussions with the chief and, again, I was very concerned about why we weren’t going to do it,” she continued.

“But it did ease my mind a little bit and I get that our community, we don’t have these problems, but all it takes is one incident, one incident that we don’t have, but then he explained to me that in that one incident the camera might not be on where it needs to be, so I get all that. I get that if we had unlimited funds and we were able to fund it, absolutely we would.

“I’m comfortable holding out a year but I really do want to keep it on as a priority and because we’ve had discussions on communities that are going away from it, I really would, chief, like for you to do a little research on that and provide me that information on the communities that are going away from it and why they’re going away, because I know that has come up in discussions.

“I really do hope we keep this on the top of the priority list moving forward.”

Rains responded that, “I’m certainly not advocating that it isn’t important for us to continue to study. We certainly want to make sure that we’re providing the mayor and council with accurate information and will assure every one of you it will continue to stay on the front burner and that ultimately if we find the resources, sometimes there’s grants that will assist us in making that transition. I think it’s something that no one’s opposed to from a staff perspective. It just seems to be a bit of a changing environment today.”

Councilman Dick Powell said that when camera discussions started, he felt it was something that the city really wanted to do.

“And I was really enlightened when the chief said. OK, there’s two sides to this. There’s the expense and trying to find things that go way back and someone pull them out and make them available and who gets them and how much does it cost and what do they have to go through to get them, and also the angle of camera, because if you’re looking the wrong way it can also skew a picture, it can make someone look guilty although they’re not, the perspective of the camera might put someone close or whatever.

“So, I’m glad that we’re going to have a least this year to try to learn more about them and learn more about the expense of trying to manage them.”


S&P 500 company coming to city
Average of salaries listed at $45,455

(Posted May 5, 2017)


The staff report is HERE


The development agreement is HERE


The LKQ website is HERE



The City Council has approved a development agreement that will bring a S&P 500 company to the city’s west side industrial area.

The agreement, approved Monday night, calls for Nelson Commercial Properties to acquire 140 acres at the northwest corner of Thornton and Peters roads (across from the Walmart Distribution Center) for LKQ Corp., described in the staff report as “a leading provider of alternative and specialty parts to repair and accessorize automobiles and other vehicles. They are the leading distributor and marketer of specialty aftermarket equipment, accessories, mechanical and collision alternative parts. 

“LKQ was initially formed in 1998 through the combination of a number of wholesale recycled products businesses located in Florida, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. They subsequently expanded through internal development and over 220 acquisitions of aftermarket, recycled, refurbished, and remanufactured product suppliers and manufacturers; self service retail businesses; and specialty vehicle aftermarket equipment and accessories suppliers. 

“They have now selected Casa Grande as one of their key southwestern locations.”

City Manager Larry Rains told the council that, “What they do is they’ll bring in these vehicles into this warehouse, they’ll strip them down and ultimately reuse, as I understand, practically every part of the vehicle. That’s becoming a very common practice.”

The LKQ website describes company operations as providing an extensive selection of high-quality replacement parts for just about any vehicle, including:

• Recycled original equipment auto and truck parts.

• New Keystone Automotive aftermarket and specialty parts.

• Reconditioned OE replacement parts.

• Remanufactured engines and transmissions.

• Rebuilt OE replacement parts.

• Heavy truck and equipment parts and used trucks.

• Paint and body shop supplies and equipment.

• Salvage vehicle disposal, national part purchase programs and insurer services. 

• Bulk sales.

• Nationwide network that offers any type of replacement part for any vehicle.

According to the report, Nelson will construct a 100,000-square foot-building, with an approximate capital investment of $25 million, for LKQ, which will “hire about 55 full­time employees at start­up with an average wage of at least $45,455 each, with the intent to expand to 80 full time employees with estimated annual wages of nearly $3.6 million.”

It was pointed out during the council discussion that the $45,455 figure is an average of all salaries to be paid, not individual compensation.

The report says Nelson will start construction within a year of closing the land deal, “however, they are estimating a completion date on Sept. 1, 2018.”

Rains said, “So, it’s a really good economic development project coming to Casa Grande.”

The development agreement also requires Nelson to construct, at its own expense, the offsite improvements necessary to serve the development, with the exception of the future expansion of Thornton and Peters roads.

“Really, that goes along with what we’ve been talking about from a city perspective in this industrial corridor, is that it’s somewhat difficult to really plan for the expansion of Thornton Road. It’s obviously been something that we have talked about as a city for our future infrastructure. 

“So ultimately what you find in the development agreements that we’ve negotiated in the past, as well as the ones that we are in negotiation now, it becomes, in my mind, more practical for the city ultimately to construct these roadway improvements in this corridor.”

It was also pointed out that in the future, part of the San Carlos Irrigation and Drainage District canal in the area might be relocated or abandoned.

“We do have a provision in the agreement that Nelson Corp. has agreed to set aside $200,000 for the relocation of the SCIID canal should it need to transpire as part of the expansion of Thornton Road,” Rains said.

“Staff’s perspective is that we’d like to get that Thornton canal abandoned. It serves just a handful of users. That would be our primary objective.

“We continue to work with the irrigation district, but we do not have a formal update to give at this point in time.”

Mayor Craig McFarland said, “Hopefully, we can get it abandoned, because that’ll actually improve that entire Thornton corridor, not just LKQ’s property.”

Approval of the agreement was unanimous, with Councilman Dick Powell on excused absence.


Major change in PhoenixMart sewer agreement

(Posted May 4, 2017)


The complete staff report is HERE


The complete new agreement is HERE


You can watch video of the complete discussion by clicking on Item 13 at

http://casagrandeaz.swagit.com/play/05012017-1578



In the ever-changing world of the PhoenixMart project, the City Council has given initial approval to a new agreement on who will construct a major sewer line to the east side and the project itself.

Final approval is expected during the next council meeting.

The original agreement from 2014 called for the city to build the entire line, with PhoenixMart paying a share.

Under the new agreement, the city will build the line to just east of Interstate 10, boring under the highway, and PhoenixMart’s parent company, AZ Sourcing, will construct the remaining line to its site north of Florence Boulevard between Overfield and Toltec Buttes roads

The original estimate was that it would cost the city $10 million for the complete line, with PhoenixMart paying $4.8 million as its share. The new estimate is $2.5 million for the city’s share to just east of I-10, with PhoenixMart picking up the rest. The city’s share will be paid from development impact fees and construction sales tax funds.

The line will still be upsized to allow for capacity for future other development on the east side. The initial part of the line will be 36 inches, narrowing to 21 inches at PhoenixMart.

There has been concern about PhoenixMart’s ability to pay for its share, given the slowness of the project and other problems.

The new agreement calls for PhoenixMart to post financial assurances that the city could take to complete the line if PhoenixMart backs out or fails.

During Monday night’s council meeting, City Manager Larry Rains outlined the new agreement and some background.

“As the community knows,” he said, “the city has been working very diligently with AZ Sourcing for several years, 2014, on actually siting an alignment of a sewer line to the east side that would not only serve AZ Sourcing and PhoenixMart development but also be a primary sewer main for the east side for future development.

“Since 2014 when we entered into a mutual agreement, AZ Sourcing has worked diligently to actually procure engineers that would engineer the segments. We’ve worked very closely with them and both of the engineering firms that we’ve worked with have finalized their design for the sewer line.

“Some months ago, we were approached by the representatives of that organization (AZ Sourcing), asking the city if we would be interested in making some modifications, potentially an amendment to the agreement we entered into in 2014.

“Ultimately, as we began the discussions we found that it would be just probably more practical, given some of the changes that would come before the council in a new agreement.”

Under the 2014 agreement, Rains continued, the city would have built the entire line after AZ Sourcing had paid the design costs.

“We had estimated the project cost to be roughly $10 million,” he said. “AZ Sourcing was going to be responsible for roughly $4.8 million of that $10 million line in three incremental payments of $1.6 million that would be paid under a phasing plan as the growth of their development occurred.”

The new agreement has the line following the same alignment, Rains said, “a 36-inch that starts where our current line terminates on Kortsen, it runs under the interstate and then ultimately will move along Kleck Road, which is is also Kortsen, down Hacienda and then east to the PhoenixMart site. “Then as we get closer to the site it actually goes from a 36 to a 30 to a 27 to a 21-inch line.

“Again, it is engineered sufficient to provide sufficient capacity for the east side.

“When we began to have communications with the AZ Sourcing team, our intent from a city staff perspective to was always ensure that we would continue to build a line that would meet the growth of the region and not just for the PhoenixMart project itself.

“We also were very concerned with the workmanship. We wanted to ensure that it would meet the standards that we had designed the plans to.

“And so ultimately as we began to discuss the incremental upsizing of the lines, we found that was going to become more practical and probably a lot more easy to account for and to administer if we simply took on that first segment of line which, in fact, was designed separately in concert with the potential traffic interchange (at I-10) improvements on Kortsen itself.

“That particular segment of line has been designed by a different engineering firm. There’s a distinct start and stopping point, but obviously a key component to the AZ Sourcing team continuing from that point to there.”


Other provisions

“We would be waiving the plan review fees and the costs associated with permitting,” Rains said. “Again, that was a cost that we would have borne if we would have actually constructed the line ourselves, and so ultimately we’ve elected to waive that cost, primarily given the fact that they have been gracious enough to pay for the engineering.

“We have also asked them to install what we would consider to be a higher quality of sewer manhole in this line. We refer to it as a polymer sewer manhole. We are anxious to test these particular manholes against some of the byproducts of our wastewater stream. 

“We would ultimately credit the development impact fees that they would be responsible for by that same amount. 

“Keep in mind, that is not an offset, at least for the city. We’ll be having to come up with funds from another fund to reimburse our development impact fee funds, but ultimately a reduction to them because of the incremental upsize and to the standard we’re asking for.”


Outside help

“They’ve also agreed to hire a consultant that we agreed to, as well, which is Sunrise Engineering, to do what I would consider to maintain the quality of work to ensure the workmanship that is transpiring throughout this entire line,” Rains said.

“So ultimately what this means for us … is that we would bring back through our construction manager at risk procurement process we’d be bringing back a guaranteed maximum price to the mayor and council in the next couple of weeks.

“We believe that that GMP, along with the other costs, is approximately $2.5 million. So we move from a $10-million outlay to a $2.5-million outlay under this particular agreement.”


Property owners

“We’re also working with the various property owners on the alignment,” Rains said. “They’ve agreed to dedicate the right of way in order to have stubs from the sewer line and water line perceptive. There’s been some provisions that have been included in this agreement to ensure that that would happen, but from a stub perspective for the property owners as well as for financial assurances. Should they (AZ Sourcing) not be able to complete their projects we can ultimately pull the financial assurances and ensure that the sewer line, and potentially, the water line would be completed.

“We envision that we will be starting the process on the dedication and the right of way necessary for this project in the next couple of weeks, as well.”


Questions from the City Council

Councilwoman Lisa Fitzgibbons asked for more details about the financial assurances from AZ Sourcing.

Rains responded that, “Ultimately, there will be a cost estimate that will be done by an engineer for AZ Sourcing and they’ll meet with our technical team to evaluate whether or not our technical team agrees or disagrees with that.

“Essentially, what will transpire is that once the cost for their segment of line has been agreed upon they will have to post a financial assurance acceptable  to the city. It’s very similar to any other development that takes place in the city.

“We haven’t come to what I would consider to be complete terms about the mechanisms behind that or what mechanism they’re going to use in their financial assurances but ultimately the money would be secure so that if AZ Sourcing could not complete their component of the line, we ultimately would be able to pull that financial assurance and ensure that the line was built.”

During the City Council discussion when the original agreement was approved in 2014, questions arose about AZ Sourcing wanting to use a land deed as security rather than post monetary assurances.

"Specifically, AZ Sourcing had requested that the city consider accepting a deed trust on property," City Attorney Wallace told the council during that meeting. "That is obviously something that city has generally not done, for a number of reasons.

"We were able to share those myriad reasons with AZ Sourcing and fortunately they have now agreed to withdraw their request to use a deed of trust. They have agreed to post a surety bond, irrevocable letter of credit, cash deposit or cash equivalent as security.

"There's also language in the agreement that would allow them to do other similar means, but our intent in doing that is that they be similar to those cash items. They need to be a substantial equivalent of the cash-based securities.

"The agreement I think made clear that land would not be acceptable as security …”

Councilman Matt Herman reminded that the project is actually multipurpose.

“It’s really to open up development on the east side, not specifically for one project,” he said.

“We’ve been talking about this for a long time. I’m glad to see it’s finally done. It really gives me a lot of confidence. Number one, that the engineer to our liking, to their liking, will make sure that it is done right, and also now we’re outlaying $2.5 million as opposed to $10 million as a city, so that really helps a lot.

“Good job. I’m really happy with how it came out.”

Initial approval of the revised agreement was unanimous, with Councilman Dick Powell on excused absence.


Final approval for CG Commons site changes

(Posted Feb. 6, 2017)


First, contrary to postings and speculation on social media, it doesn’t affect the present Promenade shopping mall.

Second, it’s far, far in the future — hinging on future growth and the proposed Kortsen Road interchange, which the city does not have the money to build — and could be changed again.

It’s the request to change land uses in what is now known as Casa Grande Commons, the acreage running north from the mall.

And it’s a request that brought some sparring on the City Council when it was first discussed on Jan. 17.

Final approval for the changes was given Monday night by the City Council.

As Planning and Development Director Paul Tice told the council during first consideration, “Another way to think about it is essentially a zone change request.

“It originally was part of the Casa Grande Regional Shopping Center planned area development where our mall has been built. The vacant property has been purchased by the Walton Group and it’s being rebranded as a new PAD known as the Casa Grande Commons PAD.”

Tice said a General Plan amendment a year and a half to two years ago took much of the property out of the residential land use category, changing to commerce and business.

The latest change, he said, shows four areas of Casa Grande Commons, three of which are commercial and one residential, broken down as 414 acres of regional business and 50 acres of residential.

(The areas are shown in the PAD guide, link above.)


Building height

What caught the attention of Councilman Dick Powell was building heights and separations from the residential area.

In general, Tice said, commercial buildings are limited to 45 feet high, with a 30-foot limit in transitional commercial, such as the small piece in the lower right of the above land map.

But, there is a proposed exemption in both areas to allow 100 feet for hospitals, office campuses and hotels. 

complimentary commercial areas the max building height there is 45 feet.

“As we looked at that, staff became a little concerned about 100-foot building heights close to the boundary of this PAD, especially where it might abut an existing or future residential area,” Tice told the council. “We thought putting 100-foot-tall buildings, basically 20, 25 feet from the boundary, from the perimeter, was going to be too close in those areas and we needed to push those buildings further back to achieve land use compatibility.

“We developed a compatibility standard — which the applicant has agreed to — which is that all buildings within 200 feet of any part of the boundary that is adjacent to residential, future or existing, would be limited to 30-foot height. So, these 100-foot buildings would have to be 200 feet back from the boundary in those cases.

“The other compatibility standard was to introduce what we call a landscape buffer at those same locations. The buffer was a 30-foot landscape buffer and in that buffer the trees would have to be increased from our normal size of 24-inch box to 36-inch and half of them would have to be evergreen so we have a year-round screen and spaced at a maximum of 30 feet apart.”

The developer had asked for exceptions for multifamily buildings such as apartments next to single-family homes.

“What they’ve asked is that they be allowed to have multifamily structures adjacent to single-family up to 50 feet tall as long as they provide a 75-foot setback from the single-family site and they provide a landscape buffer that is 25 feet wide and the minimum number of trees at one per 30 feet, 50 percent of which shall be evergreen.

“In the PAD, that eastern boundary is adjacent to Hacienda Road. Hacienda will have 110-foot right of way, so the single family in this case is going to be on the east side of Hacienda. So, you would have the intervening street of 110 feet, an additional 75-foot setback and in that 75 foot a 25-foot landscape setback with the wall and the trees, so actually you’re going to get more than 75, a lot further than 75 feet from the back yards of those singe-family homes.

“On the south area there’s planned to be a collector street that would have a 60-feet right of way. And again, any single-family homes built to the south of here will have the intervening street, then the 25-foot landscape and then a building setback of 75 feet.

“Really, the only location in this PAD that multifamily can be built is around along the eastern border of that yellow area, and that’s because the General Plan requires that multifamily housing have primary direct access onto an arterial or collector street. 

“For this reason, staff believes that it would be appropriate to grant the exception. We think that actually with the exception, which requires the increased building setback, the landscape buffer, we’ll get a better outcome than our current code which allows two-story buildings can be put 20 feet away from the property without the landscape setback.”

Tice said a close example is Tierra Pointe, adding that, “The buildings are 43 feet tall, not 50, and you can see how that is adjacent to McCartney Center of single-family, increased building setback and the landscape buffer, as well, from that single-family home.”


Powell objections

Councilman Powell said, “It seems like we’ve changed our standards pretty much by letting other places use it and have it in other PADs and plans. And the two-story for apartment can be done pretty much, if you want to do it now in Casa Grande.”

That’s not the case, Tice responded.

“We haven’t changed things across the board,,” he said, “but the code does allow for council to consider and grant exceptions if you think they are appropriate. So, any exception that’s granted, it’s only granted through council action by request.”

It’s probably too early to be making such decisions, Powell said.

“This is going to be a project that’s five, six years, at least, down the road,” he continued. “Before you get onto Kortsen Road you have to have an interchange, you have to know who’s putting up the money to build the interchange.

“When you give people approval ahead of time, you really don’t know, a future council you kind of tie their hands. I would rather see us go three story, which is a story more than we normally grant, and at the time they’re ready they can come back to council if they can make a case to get the 50 foot.

“I don’t see why anybody that wants to do it now can’t come in and say we want to build all the apartments 50 feet tall, because you’ve let some others do it and if they’ve done it, everybody should be able to do it.

“The thing about a 50-foot apartment that makes it a little bit different than a hospital or something else, this is where people live and have all their belongings. They’ve got kids, everybody’s in there. In a hotel, people check in, it’s pretty empty during the daytime, they sleep overnight, they leave in the morning.”

Fire safety is also an issue, Powell said.

“When you talk about a 50-foot height and try to fight a fire on that tall of an apartment building there’s some real danger. I talked to our fire chief today about what could happen.

“One of the things that’s interesting is a 50-foot ladder won’t reach the top of a 50-foot building because you have to have the lean effect to get up it. If those started to catch on fire or whatever, it would be problematic to guarantee the safety of the citizens.”

Tice pointed out that major water lines have to be extended to the proposed PhoenixMart to the east, coming through the Kortsen corridor and providing enough water for firefighting in the Casa Grande Commons area.

Fire Chief Scott Miller said, “Sprinkler systems will be built into the system, so you’re going to have it where if something did happen — and not saying it’s catastrophic — such as a room content fire, one or two heads usually will control it and put it out unless there was some catastrophic failure of that. So I don’t see a concern with that.

“Regarding 10 stories, we have the two ladder trucks. One’s a hundred foot, one’s a hundred and 14 feet. If you average 10 feet per floor, I would say you could get up to about a eight-story to be able to get to a window. It just depends on the setback, as Councilman Powell has alluded to, because that does lower reach. And that’s where the fire marshal comes in and looks at roadway access around the building, so we always have some kind of an access.

“As far as the sprinkler system in there, that’s the best protection and we’d be going up and inside and hooking up to the standpipes in the stairwells and then extending on in from there, so it’s designed with those safety features in mind.”


Other council views

Councilman Ralph Varela asked if coming back later for changes could cause obstacles for the developer.

Tice responded that, “What would have to happen with that procedure is they would have to come through with another amendment to request for the PAD to amend that, create the new standard. So, it would be the process just like we’re going through now.”

Mayor Craig McFarland asked if that would cost a lot of money.

Tice answered, “It would cost. I think the short answer is, yes, it would be in the neighborhood of processing fees of over $2,000 plus whatever legal fees or consulting fee they would be paid.”

Powell said, “But they probably wouldn’t have any money in construction at the point they ask for that so they could built at 50 feet.”

That is correct, Tice said.

Councilwoman Mary Kortsen wanted to know if fire safety would be considered before anything is built. 

“We would never, would we, build something that is not fire safe, we wouldn’t allow it?” she asked.

Tice answered that, “No, we would not build it if it was unsafe. There are a couple of opportunities in the process for review of fire safety. One is at the site plan level, where we just start putting our paper together, citing the building, the parking, the access ways. And the fire marshal’s in that review process to make sure that there’s adequate provision for fire access. And at the building permit stage, the building stage, all of these would be sprinkled buildings, and there’s an additional review for fire apparatus access. So, yes, there is opportunity for fire review at different points in the review process.”

If problems are found, the developer would have to alter plans.

Powell was still not happy.

“I’m disappointed, I guess, to see us make deals with almost every developer that comes along, special accommodations,” he said. “Basically what it does, it waters down the effectiveness of our code. And when we make an exception, I can guarantee you that people if they put in apartments they’re going to want it to be 50 foot.

“This is going to be a really busy road on Kortsen. They said it was designed to be on the section lines where it would be the busiest on the arterial roads, but you can’t keep people and commercial away from a busy highway and that’s going to be an extremely busy road.

“We don’t know yet when it will happen. It’s going to be well into our future unless something pops and somebody comes up and says we’ll pay for that interchange.

“I just hate to set a precedent right now with this sitting council, because we don’t know what it looks like in five or six years when this thing may be ready to be built. Maybe it’s a good idea, maybe it’s not a good idea. I’d rather set it at three stories and then let them come back. You can always come back and ask for a plan exception, it’s done all the time, if you have a good reason for it.

“I’m not going to commit civil war or anything about this, but I’m disappointed to see us not enforcing the rules that we have and making, in my mind, too many exceptions to the bigger developers and some of the small people that need something are not necessarily going to get it. It’s usually somebody that’s got a big development going. That does trouble me, but whatever the council’s pleasure is I’ll accept.”

That riled Councilwoman Kortsen.

“Personally, as each of these were brought up over the nine and a half, 10 years I’ve been doing this (on council) I can’t recall a time, truly, where I have voted one way or the other based on the need of a person that was on the proposal. If it’s small proposal, if it’s another proposal.

“I don’t care for the inference that I have participated in the idea that the developers come to town and we give them what they want. I can’t recall a time since I’ve been on council that we haven’t actively discussed, had different opinions. There’s been times where I thought of one thing and I thought, wow, that’s good point to whatever someone said.

“And so I just want that to be said, that as we’re looking at this piece, this piece is a future part. I believe that as we do each one, we considered each one, there’s been  discussion on buffers, on fire prevention, and that sort of thing and there there’s been consideration It isn’t as if we sat down and we rolled over on it.”

Powell answered, “Mary, I’m not talking about what you vote on, what I’m talking about it what has been presented to council. If you have somebody that wants to build a five-story hotel in other places, we haven’t seen that kind of thing come from the small people. It’s almost always the big one.

“If you go back and look, almost invariably, and a lot of times they deserve it. They’re putting in a lot of infrastructure, they have some innovation that makes things different that we will change for if it is an improvement or something that embellishes the result we’re going to get.

“But it’s not always the case and it’s always basically the bigger ones that that happens with.”

Kortsen responded, “I’m not going to get into that argument.”

Councilwoman Lisa Fitzgibbons said, “I’m not looking at it on who is bringing it, either.

“I understand your point, Dick, and I think over the years I’ve been on council we’re all pretty conservative on making sure that we’re setting a precedent. And I get that.

“We have so many exciting things going on in this community and I think when you look at the future these people aren’t buying homes, they’re buying apartments because it more affordable, it’s convenient.

“So I get your point but we have the flexibility here. They’re not guaranteeing they’re building a five-story building, but at least we have the flexibility to be progressive and competitive with cities that we compete with, Phoenix, Tucson, whatever. 

“I get your point, I do respect that, Dick, but I’m looking at the future and I think this is something we could use here.”

The vote that night for initial approval was unanimous, with Powell adding an explanation of his yes vote.

“I have a competent that I don’t like,” he said, “but I’m not going to vote against the plan, it’s good plan overall.”

Monday night’s final approval was under the consent agenda, with no discussion.


Police body, dash cams projects moving ahead

(Posted Jan. 17,  2017)


The presentation PowerPoint is HERE


You'll find video of the study session at

http://casagrandeaz.swagit.com/play/01032017-1658


Scroll to next story for the report on the initial body cams presentation in January 2016




It’s been a year since the Casa Grande Police Department held a study session with the City Council to outline progress on equipping officers with body cameras and updated dash cams.

Much has changed since then, the council was told during an  update study session this Jan. 3.

The equipment is better, a cheaper way has been found and the department wants to equip all officers at once rather than the piecemeal initial idea.

No date for implementation has yet been given, working out further details.

“Each body camera costs $399 and then the data plan,” Lt. Frank Alanis, commander of the Special Operations Division and lead officer on the project, said. “The data storage is unlimited for $79 per officer per month.

“You can compare it to a cell phone. Going into the product, you have to buy the cameras, but once you get that it’s just dealing with subscriptions.

“One of the things, by waiting it’s actually worked to our advantage because when we first started this process it was 100 gigabytes per officer, now it’s $79 per officer per month but we have unlimited data, so they can capture as much video as they want. That’s a set price and it’s the same thing with the dash cams.

The first-year cost would be $66,240 for 60 body cams, 10 docking stations, a five-year warranty and the storage fee. Each year thereafter would be a total of $59,040 for the storage and warranty.

When cables and other equipment is installed at the Police Department, implementation will be in four phases, each about a week long, Alanis said. 

“The first group of people we want to get outfitted would be the day shift and the traffic unit,” he continued. “The second group would be the swing shift and the grave squads, the third group would be day relief and grave relief and our final group would be the Community Response Team and K-9s.”

Overall, 58 cameras will be needed for officers, and another two being kept in reserve in case of problems with other cameras.

At the end of shift, the body cameras would be placed in a docking station which transmits the camera contents to electronic storage.

Councilman Dick Powell asked how long it would take to retrieve any information.

Alanis responded, “I found it very simple, and I’m not a computer guy by any means. The video is right there As soon as it’s tagged, you can just go in and do search by officer, search by incident and it’ll come right up. They do have longterm storage for videos that have been in 20 years. That’s going to take a little longer. But anything we’ve sent within the last year you’re looking at minutes, that fast.”

Councilwoman Donna McBride asked if any officers are now using body cams they have purchased on their own.

Police Chief Mark McCrory responded, “We did. We found out about it and we’ve issued a general order for them to stop, for the simple purpose is that creates a lot more hassle and a lot more legal problems than it does help anybody.

“Right now, as we sit here today, there should not be one man or woman on our Police Department wearing their own camera.”


Dash cams

A story in the Casa Grande Dispatch newspaper said that each dash cam would cost $4,500 and that the department needed to ask the council for the money.

That is not the case.

“Currently we will have 16 new Tahoes that do not have (updated) dash cams in them,” McCrory told the council. We did not (originally) when we came to council ask for the dash cams because they were about $5,000 to $6,000 per dash cam and at the time our own internal feeling was we would be body-worn cameras first and then we’d come along with the dash cams. That got slowed up a little bit through no fault of anybody. 

“Frank has talked to Taser and their dash cams are $500 apiece. That saves $4,500 right off the top per vehicle and they integrate better with where we want to be in the future. We have that money available right now in line items, so when that product comes out (the target date is March) we’re planning on getting the 16 vehicles that we have outfitted with the Taser dash cam.”

Councilman Dick Powell asked if the dash cams would go on automatically when a body cam is being used.

McCrory replied, “We’re looking to go toward the Taser dash cam and the body-worn camera, they will sync.”

When on?

The leading question about use of body cams is, when will they be turned on?

“Basically, it comes under the discretion of the officer,” Lt. Frank Alanis, commander of the Special Operations Division and the lead person on the project, said. “If they feel they need to turn it on, they will turn it on.”

However, there will be some rules, McCrory told the council.

“We have developed a draft policy for our agency should we go to the Body One camera,” he continued. “What we have done collectively as command staff is set down and reviewed some policies of agencies that have existing policies on Body One cameras and taken out some items from those that … we’ve mixed and matched to cover our needs here and lay out the criteria for how those body-worn cameras will be used, when it must be used, who has access to it.

“And we feel like we have a pretty strong draft policy for this right now that would enable us, if this project is approved, eventually to move into a deployment stage with the idea that our body-worn camera policy as we have it written we think is very solid, but it would be a fluid policy because it will be something that when this implemented that we will see it needs tweaked or needs changed.

“The initial body-worn camera policy probably realistically, I guess, would look differently after a year because we would find some things that needed tweaked to better fit our department and to cover areas that maybe we have missed.”


Who sees the camera videos?

Councilman Ralph Varela said, “On the policy part, I think a lot of issues come up in terms of the release of information that comes from an incident. Will that be part of the policy in terms of who that information is released to? Is it public domain, is it investigative (individuals) only? How is that going to happen?”

McCrory responded, “It’s not really the who, but it’s the how.

“We’ve talked with (City Attorney Brett Wallace) on open records requests and there’s things that he will be required to do through release to the defense counsels and things like that. He’s provided us with a lot of insight as to some of those questions that maybe we wouldn’t have really thought of on our side of the justice system that he brought up as to what needs released, when he has no choice to release it, how we’re going to handle open records requests, how we’re going to do redaction of certain things in those requests, because obviously we just can’t take the footage and just hand it out as is because we could have juveniles in it, we have people giving Social Security numbers, things along that line.

“There may be a need … of possibly an additional position, and most likely in the City Attorney’s Office, at some point to handle open records requests, redaction, preparing cases for prosecution and providing items for the defense. We’ve discussed initially for us having temporary help at the Police Department for open records requests that we can handle to alleviate some of the issues off of Brett.

“And, again, this is all guesswork on this part. We don’t know what to anticipate as far as requests. We do anticipate initially there’s going to be a lot of interest in this and people are just going to be hitting us with open records requests just to see what’s going on. We also anticipate that there’s going to be some, maybe, news media sources that will be looking for this as a way to generate stories or think they’ll maybe uncover something or just to see what we’re doing on a day-to-day basis.”

City Attorney Wallace added, “Especially when you first implement the cameras you can anticipate a lot of people just wanting to see the information. And the jurisdictions I’ve talked to, they’ve seen that, people who will mass request, if they’re going to go to trial they’ll mass request videos from the officer that’s going to be there just to fish and see if there’s anything in there.

“And then the upticks you see is if you have a critical incident, if you have an incident of newsworthy coverage,  you will see people making requests for that, as well.

“So we do anticipate at least initially to have more public records requests, but that would go down sometime after that.

“From the prosecution standpoint there’s going to be a lot more evidence available to us. It’s going to be a very useful tool for us. From a prosecution standpoint it’s going to help us dispense justice in a better way overall because we’re going to be able to see a lot of things.

“Some of these jurisdictions have seen slight increases in the number of pleas taken, slight increases in the number of charges that the prosecutors were able to sustain.

“But with that comes, obviously, a substantial amount of time watching the videos and reviewing the footage, because for every hour they take tape if it’s our case we’re watching an hour of it, as well.”

Varela told the chief, “ I think part of the national discussion is some police departments have been more accommodating in releasing information as opposed to others that others that withheld it for a year and that created a lot of community dissension, so I’m sure that that’s part of the policy process that you’ll be going through.”

Yes, the chief replied.


Powell said, “I would think this (cameras) would really be beneficial to the Police Department. When you have two parties that realize they’re being videoed, they’ll probably be more civil than they might be if they didn’t realize, OK, if I get in trouble with my mouth it’s going to be on record, I need to handle it.

“This has been a really tough past year for policemen and there’s so many people that are rallying around the blue line, but I think this really helps a lot of times to refute false claims that an officer did this or did that when you have video proof that that was not the case. It really vindicates him and the Police Department both.

McCrory responded, “Along those lines, we are very fortunate here in our community that we have an unbelievable amount of support from the public. What I think this does for us is showing them that their support is warranted and that we really have nothing to hide. The word transparent or transparency gets used to many times, but it is important, especially in our profession today. And I think what this shows the public is that their support is warranted and that their Police Department really is able to be transparent and we are who they think we are.”


City manager’s view

City Manager Larry Rains said that night’s presentation was primarily twofold: “1) to bring the newest council members up to speed with what we’re doing on this project, but 2) there’s been some question as to why we’ve waited this long to get to this point.

“Part of it has been that we’ve seen the industry really changing, from a camera that cost a lot of money and without a storage plan into more of what I will say, very simplistically, is something that almost models your cellphone plan, where you’re getting a device and the instrument that’s pretty affordable, but you’re paying for the data and for the storage thereafter.”

Using the previous piecemeal plan of adding 15 cameras a year would be manageable, Rain said, but would cause difficulties in trying to determine which officers had cameras during an incident, “so fully deploying this will be better on the police side, there’s no doubt. 

“But it’s going to drive some indirect costs that the chief pointed out that we are trying to quantify now. And as we bring the items back before council for your consideration of the procurement piece of this project, we are certainly going to be outlining, we’re going to better study the staffing component that we think we’re going need and outline that to the council so that you’re fully aware of that when we make our decision.”


First body cams presentation, January 2016

(Originally posted Jan. 14, 2016)



Casa Grande is inching closer to begin outfitting police Patrol Division officers with body cameras.

As outlined during a City Council study session, it will be a multiyear process, buying 10 Taser AXON Body 2 cameras to start and more in future years as the budgets allow.

The timeline for approval is still uncertain, depending upon further review and completion of a department policy, but could be back before the council in a month or so.

" A body camera is basically a video/audio recording device worn by officers," Interim Police Services Manager Chris Vasquez told the council.

"It basically gives a perspective of how we (the officer) see it, not (people on sidelines) It's to give our viewpoint of what we see as an officer is out there conducting a traffic stop or a crime or a simple stop.

"We believe it will further enhance public trust. With everything going on in the country, Ferguson, St. Louis, the issues that departments are facing, we believe a good sound program, a good sound policy in how we do this will go to improve, or the maintain, the public trust that we currently have."

The body cams would be registered to individual officers, not shared during different shifts. That is to be able to accurately track use by an officer.

As Lt. Frank Alanis, commander of the Special Operations Division, outlined it, the video storage will automatically link to the City Prosecutor's Office and the Pinal County Attorney's Office through a web program known as evidence.com, a free service that comes with the body cam purchases. As explained, that allows those offices to review the videos, selecting what evidence is needed, rather than have a Police Department employee having to answer all requests.

It was later explained that the City Attorney's Office would have to review the videos if a public records request from a citizen is made, determining what could or could not be included.


Council questions

Council members had several questions about the cams and their use.

• When the officer rolls up on a call, is he required to activate the camera himself or is it activated automatically?

"It has a feature where if you turn on your emergency lights and siren it automatically turns on camera," Vasquez responded. Otherwise, it is the officer's responsibility after analyzing the situation.

• When does it know to shut off?

"It's a little bit of common sense and little bit of what's going on," Vasquez said.

• If the camera has recorded, say, some kind of a mob incident is there the ability to blur out the faces of the innocent bystanders that are watching?

"Either blur out the entire thing, where you can still tell what's going on, or individual faces in it," Vasquez responded. "That capability is there."

• Could body cam footage be used for training classes, for disciplinary action or for performance evaluations?

"If an incident occurs and the training sergeant feels that training is relevant, they make a formal request to the chief," Alanis said. "They'll discuss the video, the value in that video, create a file within evidence.com where we can keep that video and training officers can view that video for training purposes."

• What if the video shows something that is against department policy, an action that could be used for disciplining the officer?

"It's one of the conversations we've had with the department as it goes," City Attorney Brett Wallace said. "We're constantly, I think, evaluating that and asking them from a managerial perspective what do you want to do. 

"I think it's a very important question, because the officers are going to want to know and need to know if they're going to be disciplined because of something that was seen on the camera. That can be a tricky situation. 

"Certainly I think they will hold the officer accountable, they're going to have to deal with that, if they're not turning the camera on when they should, if they're not tagging videos. 

"Tagging videos is, frankly, my biggest concern and from a prosecutor's standpoint our biggest worries, one area that I think we're going to have to certainly focus on. I know the department will be focusing on it. 

"If they don't tag the videos we can't identify them, the evidence is potentially lost and that's chargeable against the prosecutor's office. So there's a lot of those policies I think will need to be evaluated. 

"I also frankly think that you're going to come out with the best policy that you can to start, and it'll be version 1.0, and if we're not on version 3.4 in a year I would be surprised, because it's such an area where you have to learn how the officers are using them, how the public is responding to them, any particular technology issues that you have. The policies, I think, are going to be changed a few times until you really figure out how they work in the city."

• What will it take to properly staff the type of records keeping involved?

"I think the with staff we currently have at the Police Department we're OK," Vasquez said. "Where it may become an issue will be Mr. Wallace, his office, when it comes to having to handle public records requests, having to redact these videos for release. He may need additional personnel. As far as us, at this point in time I don't see that as an issue. With the links allowing access for the county attorney, city attorney and city prosecutor, we don't need a PD person  to dig out video.

• The chain of use

Each time anyone accesses the videos, the log will tell who and what videos they called up.

• Will there be the ability to track whether an officer has turned on the camera, or has failed to turn it on, say, 12 out of 20 times?

"The only thing in the policy will be supervisory responsibility," Vasquez said. "Their responsibility will be to go through, not to view the video, but to make sure that all videos for that officer are there."

• What has been the reaction from police officers about the concept of body cams?

"It's very positive," Alanis said. 


Protecting officers

"The thing we really haven't talked much about, and I think everybody up here knows that," Mayor Bob Jackson said, "is the reasons we're looking at body cams right now is because of all the things that have happened where everybody has a cell phone with video camera in it and you don't see it from the officer's perspective.

"I think that more than any other reason, really, has driven this whole body cam concept.

"Who knows with the problems they've had in Chicago and Baltimore and Ferguson if body cams would have made it different? You've got a third party's perspective on a cell phone video that certainly it's like Monday morning quarterbacking. We all know what we should have done three days later, but when you're in the head of the incident it looks different.

"I think really that when we first started talking about body cams that's what drove the decision to at least start looking is that. We've been lucky here, we've not had any of those kinds of incidents, but if you have one it's too late."

As Councilman Dick Powell sees it, "I think probably 90 percent of the reason to do this is to protect the officers and our own Police Department and community and show in an incident what precedes and precipitates what actually happens, have the full footage on it.

"I think it's essential for their protection, also, to be able to record that. Someone says they did this, no I didn't, look at the video, I never did that. When you have three or four cohorts of a person standing around and they're the witnesses, you don't have the same validity that you would with that video. 

"It would certainly show up if we have misconduct of police officers and, of course, you'd want to know for sure.

"But I think in 90 percent of the cases it's going to be basically the fact that it protects. And it's a moot thing after someone looks at the footage and they walk away from it because they don't have a case."

Jackson added, "I think that's exactly the point. We had kind of a similar issue when we went to the cameras in the patrol cars, but I think it's very much about protecting an officer. It is easy to have a person's buddies take a picture of you as you're swinging at a suspect and don't see the 25 times he swung at you first."


The public's right to know

• Is there a policy that dictates how long before videos can be released? In a Chicago incident, it took nine or 10 months.

"That will be in that policy that we're developing," Vasquez said. "It goes to the city attorney and his office and  once he gives us the OK, yes, we will; if not, we won't." 

City Attorney Brett Wallace continued that, "Obviously we have to take a look, and the public record requests and the disclosure are going to be an interesting challenge as we go through. We're going to have to review, we have to redact. But with every public records request we do essentially fall under the public records laws and they favor disclosure.

"There are times if it would impede an investigation, if there's some other reason, but generally we try to release it very quickly. We do need to review the footage, though, in order to redact things. Sometimes personal identifiable information, addresses, other things that you're going to need to redact prior to releasing any of that information. That's what's going to take time."

• Can anyone request to see the footage or is it only those involved in the incident?

"With public records requests, people can ask for any information that they think is within the scope of the public's business," Wallace said. "They don't have to be personally involved. 

"Really, the only request we ask when we get requests is, is it for a commercial purpose. We ask that because it's different from what we can charge them. But ordinarily if someone asks for that information we may have to redact a good number of things that were a part of that (sensitive information), but we would make it available.

"The requests can be cumbersome, but the public records laws usually don't favor us saying, hey, it's just cumbersome. 

"But sometimes the public may have to understand that it could take a good deal of time to go through that, because when you do something like redact, let's say they have to review 20 hours of footage, you've got to review all of that footage and then you have to do the necessary redaction. So if someone makes a request for 20 hours of footage it's probably going to take someone an actual week's worth of work time in order to complete that.

"When videos first come online, people tend to be a little bit more curious and then I think most people's experience is that unless there's a incident, the further that you get on and you get used to the body cameras, there's fewer requests you're going to see. 

"You'll still see certain requests, especially if there's an incident or event going on in the city, people will go ask for those because they'll be interested in it. But as, I think, people get more used to the cameras and they see the data is not all that much information they can really get out of it, the requests would probably die down.

"The biggest issue, though, really is the redaction pieces, because body cameras are way different than the normal paper file we have, reading a police report or anything else."

Redaction is needed in some cases, Wallace said, because without it, "the video may show the layout of someone's home, may show where the security system is or the data, wireless phone, now I know what kind of phone they have. 

"People could pick up on those kinds of things, so redaction tends to be very, very important to try to protect the rights of the individuals, as well as certain aspects of the event that maybe involve the officers, as well."


What next?

"In this case," City Manager Jim Thompson said, "we're just trying to find that perfect mix, to also have policies in place. That's been the challenge, ensuring that we're all on the same page. There's an impact of Brett's office that's probably as great, if not greater, than on the department, because all the information's going to come from Brett any time there is a request. 

"Not a definite date for finish, but hopefully within a month."





A computer analysis of crime and other reports was laid over a city map to show hot spot areas







This is the area to be covered under the DDACTS effort

Police Department to roll out data driven effort against crime, crashes

(Posted Dec. 7, 2016)


Video of the chief’s presentation is HERE


A National Institute of Justice report on DDACTS is HERE



It’s called DDACTS, short for Data Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety. 

The Casa Grande Police Department will be implementing it fully beginning in January.

As the department sees it, “It is a policing crime model used to effectively and efficiently reduce crime, vehicle crashes and social harm in communities, with a strong emphasis on improving the quality of life in the city of Casa Grande.

“The goal is to achieve long term change that encourages law enforcement leaders (and local leaders) to take a data driven approach to the deployment of personnel and resources to reduce crime and crashes.”

Police Chief Mark McCrory presented the program to the City Council during Monday night’s study session.

“Basically, what this program does is it innovates location-based traffic crash, crime and calls for services and enforcement data to establish a more efficient method to deploy our resources within the city,” McCrory said.

“This is a nationally known model, it’s been incorporated in many cities.” 

The Police Department analyzed four years of crime and traffic accident reports, overlaying the information on a city map. The targeted area was centered near Cottonwood Lane and Trekell Road. It runs from Trekell to Pinal Avenue on the west and from McMurray Boulevard north to the Viola and Vekol streets area.

The four years of crime and traffic data consisting of accidents, violent crimes, narcotics, weapons and shopliftings. 

“We’re not saying that this is a bad area to live,” McCrory told the council, “and we really want to make that known. We’re going to try to make more contacts with the people that live in that area.

“All we’re saying is that we feel that in a year’s time we can make that square mile a better place for people to live, work or play based on our efforts there.

“And the combination of the statistics that we pulled over the four years it really highlighted that area as one that fit the criteria with various crimes, from some serious crimes to minor quality of life crimes, as well as our traffic collisions in that area.

“So I really do need to stress that to council and anybody else that we’re not saying this area is the worst area in Casa Grande. We’re just saying by data this is an area we feel we can improve the quality of life for people who live in that area in the next year.”


(McCrory’s full presentation on the program, along with his comments on various sections, is found below on this page.)


McCrory said his full presentation “was a very dry academic presentation, but the nuts and bolts of this is just looking for traffic issues and crime issues overlap and you try to put as much high visibility in that area as you possible can to combat both the accidents as well as the crime.

“We don’t have to invent the wheel. It’s been done in other cities to where they found that if you take high crime areas, high accident areas, there’s a place where they overlap. 

“And since all the traffic accidents, or most of them, are on the thoroughfares and most of the crimes take part in the neighborhoods or the business areas, they found that there was a correlation there that if you put your resources in that area that you cannot only have an impact on the vehicle crashes but you can also have an impact on the crime in that area.

“And by upping the enforcement effort for traffic, you run into a lot more of the people that have committed the crimes off the roadway.”

As envisioned, the program will not add costs to the Police Department.

“One of the things we’re hoping in the way the DDACTS program is set up,” McCrory said, “is that it really shouldn’t have an impact on increasing your budget or increasing your staff. It’s just really looking at ways to try to make what you have more efficient and more effective, strategically go after a problem in an area.”

The plan is expected to fully roll out in January and will be evaluated after a year.

“What we’re hoping and what our plan is that at the end of the year if this is successful, then when we do our math again this area should not be the one that stands out for us and then we will move to another,” McCrory said.

By moving to another area, he added, “this is not looking to displace crime. This isn’t looking to chase a bad guy from your neighborhood to my neighborhood. What this is doing is it’s looking at problem solving and long term solutions to some of the crime and some of the problems that we have.

“So it’s not a crime displacement, as much as a problem fixer.

“And at the end of that first year, we’ll reevaluate and do our surveys and hopefully the success in this area will show that this current area of DDACTS is no longer the one that the data tells us meets the problem and if it was that successful in that area, we’ll move it to another area and try to take place.

“But at the same time, we’re smart enough to know that even though we leave an area after a year and things go better we can’t forget about that area.

“Hopefully through our increased contacts with apartment owners, apartment managers, business owners that’ll just help us go back and stay in touch with individuals in that area so it can grow.”

At the end of that first year, the department will do a community survey to ask residents how they feel about it, McCrory said. Initially, there was also to be a survey at the beginning to act as a baseline, but that idea was discarded.

Councilman Matt Herman, noting that the target are includes apartments and two schools — “which would be a good place to have meetings and get to the youth of the community to help them take that home with them — asked how the community outreach will be handled.

McCrory responded that, “With the Police Advisory Board, we have already talked to one church in that area that has plenty of room for us to hold a meeting at. That’s one of the concrete deals.

“We also have a flyer that we’re going to put out to give people information on the DDACTS program and we’ll have information put out on neighborhood meetings.

“We’re going to welcome any kind of invitations we get from any of the business associations, business owners.

“And really when we’re getting this idea out, obviously it’s best for us to be in that area. 

“What we’d like to do and that we’ll be talking about in any kind of community meeting that we have, we’d like to get this idea out no matter what section of the city it is, because the more people that know about it, then if we move our locations next year we’ll already have that many more people educated.”


-:-


Below is the text from the presentation by Chief Mark McCrory to the City Council.

The chief’s comments on particular sections are in quotes.


What is DDACTS? 

• DDACTS is short for Data Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety. 

• It is a "Policing Crime Model" used to effectively and efficiently reduce crime, vehicle crashes and social harm in communities, with a strong emphasis on improving the quality of life in the city of Casa Grande 

• The goal is to achieve long term change that encourages law enforcement leaders (and local leaders) to take a data driven approach to the deployment of personnel and resources to reduce crime and crashes. 

CHIEF: “Basically what this program does is it innovates location-based traffic crash, crime and calls for services and enforcement data to establish a more efficient method to deploy our resources within the city.

This is a nationally known model, it’s been incorporated in many cities.” 

• The model was developed with the assistance of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, federal Department of Justice and the National Institute of Justice and relies on seven guiding principles. 

• A policing concept with a strong emphasis on community/problem oriented policing, and high visibility.


What is the DDACTS Policing Crime Model?

• Location-based policing using analytical data for specific crimes, collisions and calls for service within a one-mile city grid that was selected based on four years of data. 

• Identify crime impacted areas (high incidence locations) that are impacted by crime, crashes, and community issues related to calls for service. 

• A collaborative effort with police, citizens, businesses, community organizations and civic leaders to effectively incorporate the DDACTS model as a permanent policing model. "Everyone has a voice in the process."



DDACTS Relies on Seven Guiding Principles

1. Partners and Stakeholders Participation 

• Are essential and provide opportunity and support.

CHIEF: “Everyone has a voice in this process. It’s not something that we just dictate, but we need cooperation.

“There’s a big difference with us when we say partners and stakeholders. The idea of a stakeholder is just a person or a group that has an interest in their community and traffic safety. We do need them.

“But what we really need is we need some partners in this, and that’s people or groups that not only have a stake in it but also willing to take some sort of action.”


2. Data Collections 

• Quality and timeliness of complete data must be a priority and is critical to the supporting foundation of DDACTS. 


• Data is essentially the building blocks of DDACTS.

CHIEF: “As we move into our new computer-aided dispatch system and all our information is centralized we’ll be able to extract it easier.

“It’s going to be very important for us to use that new CAD system to get out very complete and timely data. This is almost a daily update so we have an ability to see what changes we need to make.

“Without good data this system’s not going to work. And without us using the data and analyzing the data it’s not going to work.”


• Important to know the factors and causations of crime and crashes.


3. Data Analysis 

CHIEF: “The crime analysts that we have right now really come into play because the data is really only data until the analysis process turns it into some sort of actionable information that our officers can use and our supervisors can use in making decisions on staffing or deployment.”


• Crime mapping can provide information to ID problem areas.


4. Strategic Operations 

• Unbiased basis for making strategic deployment decisions. 

• Analysis of problem locations to provide data for high enforcement locations that need additional policing intervention.

CHIEF: “Under this, we would need to identify strategies and tactics to use the data. We’ve already started that. We’re not going to push this out, roll this out, yet but we’ve made trial runs in this area and we’ve tried out different strategies and stuff right now that we already have started that we think is really going to help us get through this.

“We actually have already completed an operation plan, and the only thing that is left for us to do right now is to implement that plan. We’d like to really officially launch it some time right after the first of the year.”


5. Information sharing and outreach 

• Promote community partnership/participation. 

• Document accomplishments. 

• Progress reports. 

• Report to civic leaders. 

• Gain feedback from the community and the people that live in that area. 

• Establish open lines of communication or improve on the ones that we already have in place.


6. Monitoring, evaluating and adjusting 

• Adjust strategic operations and evaluate enforcement activity. 

• Relies on constant data changes as directed. 

• Define measurements of our success. 

• If a tactic doesn't work try another. 

• Review non-traditional data provided by officers and other sources.


7. Outcomes 

• Goals and objectives. 

• Measurements used to assess effectiveness relating to reductions. 


• Use of specific operational techniques personnel deployment.

CHIEF: “Basically, we’re looking for a reduction in calls for service, although we expect it to spike initially. We’re looking for a drop in crime rates, although they may also spike initially because we’ll have more reported crime, we hope. 

“But overall, we’re going to see how our effectiveness is by the end of that year for reduction in those.

“Use of specific operational techniques and personnel deployment basically is just to keep our personnel fluid to a point that if something is not working see how we can assign those officers to have a better impact, a greater impact, in the DDACS area.”


Purpose of DDACTS

• To effectively employ policing strategies and intervention methods, with a emphasis on crime/crash reduction without creating additional expenditures or allocating additional staff. 


• Incorporate community based crimefighting concepts that include community meetings, school presentations, Police Advisory Board meetings in the area, press releases, informational flyers and education campaigns, Neighborhood Watch meetings, speed display signs, retail merchant education, social media, etc.

CHIEF: “Some of this has already started in our initial trial run phase to where we have had officers in there reporting some types of nuisance that maybe when we get it reported as quality of life stuff like trash pickups that we’ve been working with other city departments to help clean up and just really try to make an overall impact in that area, not just on crime and traffic, but quality of life.” 


• Directs a stable target zone for police activities. 

CHIEF: A lot of times we try to give our officers a mission at the beginning of their shift to try to accomplish. And we do have such a large area that we have to patrol that sometimes there’s not a cohesive move in either direction, everybody’s out taking care of their own area.

“What this does is gives us a department area to centralize some of our police activities on available times, see if we can make an impact.”


• Uses data based policing.

CHIEF: “What that would do is that would give us a means to back up our ideas on our strategic plans or the way we deploy people, because it’s going to be all based on the data that comes out, not on our own individual bias or thoughts on that.”


How did we select the zone? 

• We allowed the data from four years of crime and traffic data consisting of accidents, violent crimes, narcotics, weapons and shoplifting to select our zone. 

• This data was overlaid on a city map as a density map. 

• Then the area with the highest heat density and volume in number of reports was selected as our target zone.

CHIEF: “What we did with the heat maps is we didn’t pick our zone as a group. Our crime analyst put out the heat maps and showed all the command staff and some of our supervisors what the maps looked like. And to a person, every one of us picked the exact same zone, based on the data in the four-year comparison of data.

“So when I say we picked the zone, really the statistics and the data that we had available picked our zone for us.”


Selected DDACTS Zone 

• The target area identified was near Cottonwood and Trekell. 

• A closer look at the data showed a target zone of one square mile (city grids C17, C18, C21 & C22). 

• Bordering streets for the square mile are Pinal to Trekell and McMurray to Viola/Vekol.

CHIEF: “We’re not saying that this is a bad area to live. And we really want to make that known. And that’s what we’re going to try to make more contacts with the people that live in that area.

“All we’re saying is that we feel that in a year’s time we can make that square mile a better place for people to live, work or play based on our efforts there.

“And the combination of the statistics that we pulled over the four years it really highlighted that area as one that fit the criteria with various crimes, from some serious crimes to minor quality of life crimes, as well as our traffic collisions in that area.

“So I really do need to stress that to council and anybody else that we’re not saying this area is the worst area in Casa Grande. We’re just saying by data this is an area we feel we can improve the quality of life for people who live in that area in the next year."


Implementation of DDACTS


• Development of an operational plan that incorporates implementation in phases. 

CHIEF: “We have already started that. We have our plan already laid out and it’s been given to our officers so they can be familiar with it already. We have them going through the DDACTS area and reporting on DDACTS, citizen contacts, crimes, report calls and things like that just to familiarize them before we actually roll this out so that we’re really not starting from scratch. When we roll this out, we want to be able to run with it.”


• Ability to utilize high visibility enforcement with a strong emphasis on supporting community engagement by gaining support from officers, stakeholders, partners, and other entities such as Public Works, Sanitation, other public utilities such as Arizona Water, APS and other governmental agencies.

CHIEF: “Really, for this to be successful for us there’s got to be a team effort and utilize other city resources and other county resources to help us really have the impact on this area that we want.”


• The operational phases began with weekly planning meetings that started on Aug. 18, 2016, including a "trial run" in the area, with a projected start date of January 2017 to fully integrate DDACTS into the city's daily operations plans. 

CHIEF: “So far inside our department we’ve gotten great buy-in on this program. Officers are really getting familiar with reporting their activity in that area and they seem really eager to see if our joint efforts can really improve the quality of life in that square mile in the next year.”


• Positive community interaction. 

CHIEF:  “We are going to move our Police Advisory Board meetings to that area and invite as many people as we can. We’ve already had some officers attend neighborhood meetings in that area and trying to get a feel for what they want and really trying to up our community interaction.”


• Good quality contacts/meaningful field interviews. 

• Immediate dissemination of information. 

• Commitment from all personnel

 

• Patrol officers spending 30 minutes each as a minimum during the course of their shift in the DDACTS zone.

CHIEF: “What we’ve asked our officers to do in relation to that is spend as much time in there as you can but still service the rest of our city. We’ve asked them if you have to go from point A to point B somewhere in our city and you have a way to drive through the DDACTS zone to get there that doesn’t take you any longer at least drive through the DDACTS zone and report to us when you’re entering and when you’re exiting so that we can keep track of how much visibility we actually have in that area.”

 

• Reports taken in the DDACTS zone will be written in the zone. 

CHIEF: “If we have a call in that area of the city, to maximize our time in there officers are not to leave that area, obviously unless there’s a high priority call or somebody needs assistance. We’re asking them if you take a report in that area, finish your report in that area. That’ll maximize our time in that area.”


• Crime reports taken in DDACTS zones will be completed within 24 hours. 

CHIEF: “Currently, some reports, officers are allowed to hold them until the end of their week, just so they have them in that week.

“To have up-to-the-minute data for our analysts to put out information to our officers we need information that’s new and fresh information. Officers would be required to complete their reports on shifts that take place in that area.”


• Proactive policing activities by detectives/sworn support staff/civilian personnel/volunteers.

CHIEF: “This is not just a Patrol function. The fact is, we’ve had some our detectives already out talking to some of the businesses and explaining to them what we’re doing a little bit and trying to get some buy-in from them. So it’s going to be an entire department operation.”


Flow of information

CHIEF: “When a police officer does something and reports are due within that 24 hours, that report will go to their supervisors and will also go to the crime analyst. The crime analyst will do a weekly summary and quarterly report on the information that we gather.

“Each sergeant is currently tasked with an area of interest and every week they put out a report for Capt. (Reginald) Winston and the rest of us about this is what we did last week, this is what we’re planning on doing this week. What they’re going to include in that now is also a DDACTS summary, so not only their area of responsibility within the city but they’ll also a summary of what actions that they took in the DDACTS zone as a squad.

“And that information will all be funneled down to the command staff and we’ll be able to evaluate any kind of effectiveness on the DDACTS zone and will be able to implement changes or reallocate some resources or adjust our plans as need be.”


How will it impact the rest of the community? 

• The department will not be changing how we do business. We will still conduct normal department operations to include increased patrol activities in areas of interest, biweekly crime suppression meetings and normal department response to major crimes and issues.

CHIEF: “It seems like we’re focusing quite a bit on just one little part of our city, so the question I would have is how it would it impact the rest of the community.

“We will not be changing how we do business. 

“And that’s a point that I really need to stress, is this will not take away from any other area of the city. What this is doing is really trying to take some of the officers’ free time and focus it on one mission to see if we can have an impact in an area of our city.

“Business will be normal for the rest of the city.”


Evaluation

The initial plan is to do the operation for a year using the following evaluation tools to decide on continuance or the need to change the zone:

 

• Surveys/feedback from citizens of Casa Grande. 

CHIEF: “Obviously, that’s going to have a lot. For us to be really effective we can’t think that we did a good job, we really need the people in that area to be able to tell us that they have noticed a difference in their quality of life or crimes and things like that for this to be worthwhile for the effort.”


• Periodic DDACTS briefings both in the department and public. 

• Feedback from partners and stakeholders. 

• Periodic impact meetings and evaluation of strategies that work.